Between the metal-crunching insanity of "Mad Max: Fury Road" and frigid mercilessness of "The Revenant", it's safe to say that 2015 brought us some of the most unforgettable films of the past decade. What made them so good? One thing was the willingness to shoot on location. Whether they were shooting in the subzero temperatures of Alberta, Canada or the blistering heat of Namibia's Namib desert, these crews traveled all around the globe to get the perfect shots. And, if you have the constitution, you can even visit some of these places today. 

Kananaskis Country, Canada —
1. Kananaskis Country, Canada — "The Revenant"

Alejandro González Iñárritu's insistence to film "The Revenant" using only natural light took the crew to some incredibly remote and epic locations, like this spot in Kananaskis Country, Canada, where much of the film was shot.

Namib Desert, Namibia —
2. Namib Desert, Namibia — "Mad Max: Fury Road"

George Miller shot "Mad Max: Fury Road" in Namibia's Namib desert, the oldest desert in the world. The beautiful shots of the barren landscapes came at a price, however — Namibian environmental groups claim that the production did some irreparable damage to the desert. 

Wadi Rum, Jordan —
3. Wadi Rum, Jordan — "The Martian"

Ripley Scott's "The Martian" takes place mostly on Mars, so the director chose to shoot the film amid the alien-like landscapes of Wadi Rum, Jordan. The majestic UNESCO World Heritage site was also the filming location for the classic film "Lawrence of Arabia."

Enniscorthy, Ireland —
4. Enniscorthy, Ireland — "Brooklyn"

It goes without saying that much of "Brooklyn" was shot in New York City. But the film centers around a young Irish immigrant from Enniscorthy, so a portion of the film was shot on location in the idyllic town.

Skelling Michael, Ireland —
5. Skelling Michael, Ireland — "Star Wars: The Force Awakens"

J.J. Abram's "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" was shot in scores of cities around the world, but one of the most striking locations was Luke Skywalker's hideout on a remote island — Skelling Michael — off the coast of Ireland. You can visit a 6th-century Christian monastery atop the island if you're willing to climb the 618 steep steps that lead to it.

Copenhagen, Denmark —
6. Copenhagen, Denmark — "The Danish Girl"

Set in 1920s Copenhagen, "The Danish Girl" follows a married man's struggle with gender identity. Director Tom Hooper says the oscar-nominated film owes a lot to Copenhagen's "untouched" city center. 

Poland —
7. Poland — "Bridge Of Spies"

Much of Steven Spielberg's "Bridge Of Spies" is set in East Berlin, and while some of the film was shot in Germany, the East Berlin scenes were filmed in Poland — including a scene that features a recreated Berlin Wall. 

Schmid Ranch, Colorado —
8. Schmid Ranch, Colorado — "The Hateful Eight"

Quentin Tarantino's latest film takes place (and was shot entirely) in Colorado, mostly on the 900-acre Schmid Ranch. Part of the reason Tarantino chose this location was the virtual certainty of there being snow, a key plot element in the film. 

Boston —
9. Boston — "Spotlight"

"Spotlight" tells the true story of Boston Globe reporters unraveling the chilling story of sex abuse within the Boston Archdiocese. The majority of the film was shot on location in Boston, a city that's highly recognizable for its Federal style and Greek Revival architecture. 

Mexico City, Mexico —
10. Mexico City, Mexico — "Spectre"

In true 007 fashion, "Spectre" opens with an exhilarating chase sequence in an exotic, gorgeous location. This time it was in Zócalo, the main square of Mexico City. Because the scene takes place during a Día de los Muertos celebration, the crew had to close the entire square and hire more than 200 costumed extras to get the shots. 

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